Ripley Gas, Water & Wastewater Logo
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Monday-Thursday: 7:30 am to 5:00 pm      New: Pay Bill Online
Friday: 7:30 am to 4:30 pm
 
  • Gas Distribution
  • Sanitary Collection
  • Water Distribution
  • Water Treatment Process
  • UTILITIES OPERATION & MAINTENANCE

    Mission: O&M accepts the daily challenge to safeguard the public's health and safety; effectively maintain and improve the water distribution, gas distribution, sanitary collections, and fire protection systems placed in our care, and provide an enhanced quality of life to customers and citizens of the City of Ripley, Tennessee.

    Operations: Maintain the City's water distribution, gas distribution, and sanitary sewer infrastructure that enable the City of Ripley, Tennessee to distribute potable water & natural gas to its customers, and collect sewage discharge from them. They ensure an adequate supply of pretreated water is readily available with sufficient pressure to meet established health department standards, and they ensure specific fire protection standards are met. This Department provides operation, maintenance and repair to the Water Distribution, Fire Protection, Gas Distribution, and Sanitary Sewer Collection Systems. This Department also provides certain support activities for the Engineering, the Water Treatment Plant, and the Wastewater Treatment Facility.

    Capacity: The O&M Department maintains approximately 90 miles of pressurized water mains, approximately 8 miles of sanitary sewer force mains, approximately 56 miles of gravity sanitary sewer mains, 21 wastewater pumping stations, approximately 200 miles of pressurized natural gas mains, 6 natural gas city gate regulator stations, and 5 natural gas secondary regulator stations. On a average day they pump 1.8 million gallons of potable water to customers within the City of Ripley. The City is capable of producing 3 million gallons of potable water per day and processing 2.8 million gallons of wastewater per day.

    Operations and Maintenance: The O&M Department has personnel on duty twenty four hours per day, seven days a week, 365 days per year. They maintain the capability to call-in additional crews to address any emergency that may occur in water, sewer, or gas mains.

    Duties: Install new water mains, water taps, sewer mains, sewer taps, gas mains, and gas services. Investigate and make necessary repairs to sewer mains, and manholes. Investigate and correct water quality complaints such as odor, rust, and bad taste. Investigate gas leak complaints and make necessary repairs to gas mains. Monitor and maintain the City's “Capacity, Management, Operation and Maintenance” (CMOM) program which tracks sanitary sewer flows, identifies sources of inflow and infiltration (I/I) to prevent sanitary sewer overflows (SSO's,) and help plan for future system improvements. Locate and mark gas, water, and sewer services on city easements and roadways to prevent damage during excavation or construction by City personnel, private citizens or agencies in accordance with the State of Tennessee's Sunshine One

    Call Law: Develop and prioritize the City's gas main replacement, water main replacement and sanitary sewer replacement / rehabilitation programs and monitor the projects generated from those programs.

    Structure: The Operations & Maintenance Superintendent is responsible for the day to day operation of the department, budgeting and long range planning. The Department, under the Superintendent is structured in the following manner:

    Gas Distribution  (return to top)

    On Call Crew: Responds to all gas distribution system related problems.

    Valve Crew: Exercises valves citywide for system maintenance. Performs "dry runs" to isolate sections of system for internal maintenance work and project/contractual work.

    Service Crews: Install, repair, and maintain gas distribution system appurtenances including; mains, services, regulator stations, valves, pressure, and meters.

    Locators: Leader receives Sunshine One Call Requests (approx. 15-30/day) and distributes copies to the pertinent City department. O&M Locators perform water distribution/fire protection, gas distribution, and sanitary sewer collection locations throughout the City's service area. Leader also submits requests to Sunshine One Call for work to be performed by the O&M Department.

    Water Distribution  (return to top)

    On Call Crew: Responds to all water distribution/fire protection system related problems.

    Valve Crew: Exercises valves citywide for system maintenance. Performs "dry runs" to isolate sections of system for internal maintenance work and project/contractual work.

    Service Crews: Install, repair, and maintain water distribution/fire protection system appurtenances including; mains, services, fire protection services, valves, fire hydrants, pressure, meters, elevated storage facilities, and altitude valves.

    Locators: Leader receives Sunshine One Call Requests (approx. 15-30/day) and distributes copies to the pertinent City department. O&M Locators perform water distribution/fire protection, gas distribution, and sanitary sewer collection locations throughout the City's service area. Leader also submits requests to Sunshine One Call for work to be performed by the O&M Department.

    Sanitary Collection  (return to top)

    On Call Truck: Responds to all sanitary collection/force main system related problems.

    TV Camera Crews: Perform televised inspections of sanitary sewer mains. Identifies need for corrective work to be performed and determines location of blockages.

    Vacon Trucks: Assist Cleaning Crew, and other O&M crews, as needed. Perform preventative maintenance cleaning of sanitary sewer gravity system and related manholes.

    Cleaning Crew: Cleans sanitary sewer gravity mains with the use of cable drawn brushes. Applies degreasers and root elimination chemicals, as needed, to help maintain flow capacity.

    WATER TREATMENT PROCESS  (return to top)

    Mission: To convert ground water to a potable water supply that meets or exceeds the Department of Environmental Protection Agency standards, Department of Health standards and the standard established by the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 (w/1999 amendments) and to provide that product to the water customers of the City of Ripley, Tennessee.

    Operations: The Water Treatment Plant is licensed to operate under specific guidelines established by the Environmental Protection Agency and the State of Tennessee. The plant is operated by Tennessee licensed Water Plant Operators with a Grade III license or higher.

    Capacity: The Water Treatment Plant is capable of producing three (3) million gallons of potable water per day (MGD.) City customers, on average, require approximately 1.8 MGD to meet their needs. Currently, the average person uses about 80 gallons of water per day. The current available “Elevated Storage” is 2.4 million gallons of potable water.

    Water Treatment Process

    Water Source & Transmission The source of our City’s drinking water is ground water that stems from underground aquifers located 700 to 800 feet below the earth’s surface. The ground water source is pumped from a depth of approximately 750 feet through underground transmission lines to the City Water Treatment Plant. There are a total of five (5) ground water wells/pumping stations (4 operable). Most ground water contains metal impurities, such as iron and manganese. Ground water, here in the City of Ripley, Tennessee, has an initial iron residual of around 7.0 mg/l with a pH Level of 6.4, but has no problem with manganese. The City Water Treatment Plant performs a series of operations that filters out the metal impurities to make the City Water attractive and drinkable.

    Aeration The first step in the treatment process is to increase the oxygen level in our water supply (source water) by using a Forced Draft Aerator with a capacity of 2,100 gallons per minute. This component of the process allows the source water to be fed into the top tray of the Aerator, and sprinkled over PVC slats while air is forced upward.

    Coagulation The second step in the treatment process is the introduction of coagulant chemicals that converts the dissolved iron into small “pin head size” particles. We add Calcium Hydroxide (Lime) to condition the water, meaning raise the pH Level. The reaction is instantaneous and occurs in the Flash Mixing Basin that has a capacity of 3,000 gallons per minute. Good practice proves that the best iron removal is obtained at a pH of 8.0 Standard Units.

    Disinfection Chlorine is also added, during the Flash Mixing Process, as a purifying agent prior to the Filtration Process. It can also be added after the Filtration Process, if needed. Federal drinking water regulations require that minimum disinfection standards be met at all times before the water can be delivered to the public. Holding the processed water in our Clear Wells (Underground Storage) provides sufficient time for final chlorine disinfection to make sure that all possible disease causing bacteria is killed by the chlorine before the water is pumped to the customer for consumption.

    Flocculation The third step in the treatment process is called Flocculation, which occurs in the center cone of the Primary Clarifier. This is a physical process in which the tiny pin head size particles created in the coagulation process are gently mixed. As they collide, they stick together forming larger and larger particles.

    Sedimentation The enlarged particles, now referred to as Floc, are transferred to the bottom of the Primary Clarifier. The velocity of water flow in the Primary Clarifier is reduced which allows the Floc to gradually sink to the bottom of the basin. This process generally takes about two hours. Settled Floc, referred to as sludge, is drained off into our sewer collection system. When the water in the Primary Clarifier is relatively free of Floc, (it having sunk to the bottom,) it passes through tube settlers and overflows into a collection flume directing water to six (6) gravity fed filters with a capacity of 2,160 gallons per minute.

    Filtration The forth step in the treatment process is gravity filtration, which consist of six (6) filters made up of Anthracite Coal, Coarse Sand, Dense Sand, and Coarse Gravel. The Filtration process ensures that any potentially harmful microorganisms and particulate matter are removed.

    Backwash The filters are backwashed once per shift or approximately every 16 hours to remove microorganisms and particulate matter captured during the filtering process. The backwash water is discharged into our sewer collection system. The filters have a service life of 10 years or more when properly maintained.

    Fluoridation Program The City of Ripley Water is enriched with fluoride to help prevent the development of tooth decay. Following the water filtration process, it is collected in an under drain pipe system where fluoride is injected as the water is directed to the Clear Well (Underground Storage).

    Storage The water is then pumped from the underground storage to the overhead tanks within the distribution system for our customers’ usage. The current available “Elevated Storage” is 2.4 million gallons of potable water.

    Operations and Maintenance The Water Plant Chief Operator and Plant Supervisor, assisted by a three man work crew, are responsible for the day-to-day operation of the plant, budgeting and long range planning. The Water Plant Chief Operator contains a Grade III or higher water treatment license from the State of Tennessee.

    The Plant Supervisor assures computerized controls are functioning as intended, maintains all mechanical equipment, maintains chemicals and adjusts feed rates, manages the repair and installation of electrical systems and hardware at the Water Treatment Plant, tests water samples to ensure the quality of water processed and delivered by the plant, collects samples at customer locations when conditions warrant, assigns work crews daily work, and any other duties needed to keep the water treatment plant functioning at peak performance.

    Hopefully, this brief discussion gives you some insight on how we make potable drinking water here in Ripley, Tennessee.
     

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